Crew watching the weather burning forest fires near Sequoia

Texas News Today

Three Rivers, Calif. – The crew watched the weather this weekend as they battled the burning California wildfires in a vast ancient sequoia orchard in an effort to protect the world’s largest tree.

The National Meteorological Agency has issued a weather warning for a severe fire situation in Sequoia National Park, Sierra Nevada, Nevada, a massive 2,000 sequoia wilderness, about a mile from Giant Forest. ..

The roots of the General Sherman tree were wrapped in a type of fire-resistant aluminum used in wilderness firefighters’ emergency shelters to protect historic wooden buildings, firefighters spokeswoman Rebecca said. Mr Patterson said.

According to the National Park Service, the General Sherman tree is the largest in the world, with a volume of 52,508 cubic feet (1,487 cubic meters). It rises 275 feet (84 m) high and its circumference is 103 feet (31 m) above the ground.

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The colony fire was one of two electric flames, together known as the KNP Complex, that burned about 18 square miles (46 square kilometers) of forested area.

Fires this week forced the evacuation of the park, and part of Three Rivers, a mountainous community of about 2,500 people outside the park’s front door. The crew has broken the line between fire and community.

Cool, mild weather and early morning low-pressure smoke blocked the air, halting the growth of recent fires, but the National Bureau of Meteorology said the low-pressure system would bring puffiness and low humidity to the fire area by Sunday. said.

But fire officials didn’t expect a surge in recent months from explosive winds turning the Sierra Nevada’s flames into hundreds of house-eating monsters.

“For the next few days, extreme weather is not very predictable. This is good news. Major wind changes are not very predictable, but there is no forecast of rain,” said Rebecca, a spokeswoman for the fire information. Mr. Patterson he said.

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Giant sequoias are adapted to fire and can help them prosper by releasing seeds from corn and creating empty lots for young sequoias to develop. However, the extraordinary intensity of fires caused by climate change can drown trees.

Fires are already burning in several gardens, including trees 200 feet (61 m) high and 2,000 years old. These include the Oriole Lake Grove in the national park and the Piron North and South Groves in the adjacent Sequoia National Forest.

The fire also reached Long Meadow Grove, a national forest, and 20 years ago, then-President Clinton signed a proclamation establishing a national monument.

“These orchards are just as impressive and ecologically important to the forest,” said Tim Bowden, Sequoia Restoration and Stewardship Manager of Save the Redwood League. I told the newsgroup. “They’re not well known. When you think about it, it makes you sick.”

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To the south, the Windifier Tree grows to about 11 square miles (28 square kilometers) in the River Indian Reservation and the Giant Sequoia National Monument, burning in one of the sequoia orchards and threatening others.

Fire officials are yet to ascertain the extent of damage caused to gardens in remote and inaccessible areas.

Last year, castlefire killed an estimated 7,500 to 10,600 large sequoias, according to the National Park Service. This was an estimated 10% to 14% of all sequoia in the world.

Today’s fire is consumed through crater-dried wood, hay, and brush.

Historical droughts linked to climate change have made fighting wildfires difficult. It killed millions of trees in California alone. Scientists say climate change over the past three decades will continue to make the West hotter, drier, more extreme weather, and more frequent and devastating wildfires.

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More than 7,000 wildfires damaged or destroyed more than 3,000 homes and other buildings in California this year and burned more than 3,000 square miles (7,770 square kilometers) of land, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire. Down.

Copyright 2021 AP Communications. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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