Alabama native accused of rioting on January 6 denied release

Texas News Today

Anchorage, Alaska — The Alabama native, who claimed the judge “led the prosecution” during the January 6 riots at the US Capitol, was released Thursday in an Alabama courtroom while his proceedings proceeded. Rejected.

Christian Matthew Manly then waived his right to a preliminary hearing and sought immediate transfer to the US District Court in the District of Columbia, whose jurisdiction is in the rioting accused.

Manly faces several crimes, including attacking and resisting police officers with dangerous weapons. civil disturbance; Show chaotic behavior and demonstrate in the Capitol building. Physical violence or engaging in chaotic and destructive acts in a prohibited building.

Manley spoke calmly and politely, calling US Magistrate Judge Matthew McCleary Scoble “sir” during a detention trial in US District Court in Anchorage. He was wearing a yellow gel and was tied at his feet.

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A mask obscured his face, but his beard and hair were video shown to assistant US attorney Stephen Collins, who was recorded as evidence of proceedings against Manly, 26, who has lived in Alaska since August. It was smaller than a man.

The government claimed that the video showed Manly trying to break into the Capitol in a tunnel. The video shows a man twice wearing cargo pants and a tactical jacket, using pepper spray on a police officer, and using an empty can as a projectile. In the video, a man is seen throwing a metal rod at a police guard guarding a building.

At some point, the man left the tunnel and waved to a greater crowd to join the protesters in an attempt to break down the building.

Subsequently, videos of both protesters and parliamentary defenders showed a man entering the building in front of a crowd in a tunnel. The government claims that Manly used his body to come to the fore in an attempt to force the Capitol’s last door while law enforcement agencies were trying to stop the riots.

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“He was leading the prosecution so to speak,” the judge said.

Before Manly was taken into custody, Scoble stated that Manley was neither an innocent bystander nor a member of the mob that did not enter the building. “They started fighting,” said the judge.

On the defensive table monitor or on the wall, sometimes with raised eyebrows, the man looked at the video enthusiastically.

His federal attorney, Samuel Aylers, failed to claim a conditional release, saying that Manley had no gun, posted riots on social media, and had no substance abuse issues. Down.

The factors in which the judge decided to detain him included the parliamentary breach being a threat to society itself, and not closely related to Manly Anchorage, which could pose a flight risk. There was something that was.

The judge said Manly served in the Marine Corps for four years, but did not receive an honorable discharge.

Two months ago, Manly moved to Alaska, where he managed his apartment. He is a commercial fisherman and was arrested by the FBI on Friday upon arrival at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport.

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FBI Special Agent Marissa Taggart said that an investigator working on the case had replaced her where Manley arrived and successfully apprehended her on the plane.

According to a statement filed by a special agent investigating the case, the informant told the FBI that he had met Manly, who had allegedly participated in the riots.

Informants later identified Manley from photographs taken during the January 6 riots at the US Capitol. The informant also claimed that Manley showed him the same picture from a list of wanted posters previously distributed by the FBI.

The FBI claimed that Manly’s phone accessed a cell site near the Capitol on January 6. Manly’s relatives also identified him as the FBI, and the document states that Manley had discussed going to a January 6 rally in Washington, DC.

Copyright 2021 AP Communications. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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