Opal Lee’s Juneteenth dream has come true, but it’s not over yet. National News

Texas News Today

For Juneteenth, we expect the celebrations to continue till July 4. We also want to include events that provide resources to help people with financial, health and other problems.

Born in Marshall in 1926, Lee grew up surrounded by pinewoods in East Texas, near the Louisiana border. Her family later moved to Fort Worth when her father was working on the railroad, but her June memories date back to her celebration as a young girl at Marshall.

“They will have music and food. They will have games and food. They will have all kinds of entertainment and food. It was like another Christmas.” Lee said.

Her memory of the Juneteenth includes a tragic attack on her family when hundreds of white people descended on her hometown of Fort Worth that day after a black family moved into a white neighborhood in 1939. I am He, his parents and his two siblings all managed to escape, but his parents never talked about that day again. According to the newspaper report at the time, the mob broke windows and furniture.

“We would have been good neighbors, but they didn’t give us the opportunity to tell us how good we are,” Lee said.

Lee’s childhood was hidden behind the black violence that prevailed in the United States. In 1921, a white mob ransacked Tulsa, Oklahoma, burning more than 1,000 homes and destroying a prosperous business district known as Black Wall Street. Two years ago, hundreds of blacks were beaten, hanged, shot, and burned at the stake by white mobs across the United States in what became known as “Red Summer.”

Opal Lee’s Juneteenth dream has come true, but it’s not over yet. National News

Source link Opal Lee’s Juneteenth dream has come true, but it’s not over yet. National News

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